Examining the functions of etiological markers in Joshua

Although traditionally claimed to have been written by Joshua himself, the virtual consensus of modern biblical scholarship recognizes that the Book of Joshua was almost certainly a literary product composed centuries after the events it depicts. One key set of evidence for this latter view concerns the oft-repeated phrase 'to this day' (Joshua 6:25, 7:26, … Continue reading Examining the functions of etiological markers in Joshua

Elisha’s Character according to the Deuteronomist

The grim account of Elisha and the taunting youths is a common point of discussion in relation to the morality of Elisha's character, and to some extent, Yahweh's, since it was the latter who bestowed Elisha with prophetic status and divine empowerment. My article attempts to nuance this discussion in the following ways: by reorientating … Continue reading Elisha’s Character according to the Deuteronomist

Interrogating 2nd Peter’s Idealized View of Lot’s Character

In the 2nd chapter of 2 Peter, the author* vividly paints Noah and Lot as lone paragons of virtue in their respective communities: 5 if he did not spare the ancient world when he brought the flood on its ungodly people, but protected Noah, a preacher of righteousness, and seven others; 6 if he condemned the cities of Sodom and … Continue reading Interrogating 2nd Peter’s Idealized View of Lot’s Character

The ‘predictions’ of the Hebrew Scriptures read retrospectively

A common view in churches goes as follows: The Hebrew Scriptures has prophets that make predictions about the future.They predict Jesus.The New Testament fulfills these predictions and verifies the accuracy of the predictive claims. Let's observe carefully the intertextual relationship between the NT and the Hebrew Scriptures before we evaluate the view above. Matthew 2:15 … Continue reading The ‘predictions’ of the Hebrew Scriptures read retrospectively

Was there an extinguished ‘musical canon’ in the early Church?

I found some interesting insights on how music and worship was understood and practiced in the early church from Lee McDonald’s paper: “The Odes of Solomon in Early Christianity: Reflections on Scripture and Canon”, in the book Sacra Scriptura: How “Non-Canonical” Texts Functioned in Early Judaism and Early Christianity p.108 – 136. McDonald points out that many … Continue reading Was there an extinguished ‘musical canon’ in the early Church?

Did James Understand Job according to Scriptures or Jewish Tradition?

In the epistle of James, we read this: 10 Brothers and sisters, as an example of patience in the face of suffering, take the prophets who spoke in the name of the Lord. 11 As you know, we count as blessed those who have persevered. You have heard of Job’s perseverance and have seen what … Continue reading Did James Understand Job according to Scriptures or Jewish Tradition?

When Biblical Translations De-mythologize

In the NRSV’s translation of Genesis 1:21, we read: So God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, of every kind, with which the waters swarm, and every winged bird of every kind. And God saw that it was good. Compare this with the KJV, NIV and ESV . The KJV renders ‘great sea monsters’ as ‘great … Continue reading When Biblical Translations De-mythologize